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GPS Spoofing: Why are Planes Getting Hacked in the Middle East?

GPS Spoofing: Why are Planes Getting Hacked in the Middle East?

BY FRANCO GROBLER 11/25/2023 AGO 0 COMMENTS

In a recent development that has raised alarms among aviation experts, dozens of commercial airliners flying over parts of the Middle East have reported experiencing GPS spoofing attacks in recent months. These attacks involve the transmission of false GPS signals, effectively tricking aircraft navigation systems into believing they are in a different location than their actual position.

 

Inside a plane cockpit | Photo: Matador Network

 

OPSGROUP

 

The group OPSGROUP, composed of pilots and flight technicians, first brought these incidents to light in September 2023. Their latest update, released in November, revealed 50 reports of GPS spoofing activity over five weeks.

 



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The implications of these attacks are potentially fatal. By manipulating the aircraft's perception of its location, spoofing can lead to pilots making critical navigation errors, potentially leading to collisions or even unauthorized incursions into restricted airspace.

 

An inertial reference system (IRS) | Photo: Wikimedia Commons

 

Furthermore, these attacks appear to target the inertial reference system (IRS), a crucial backup navigation system previously thought to be immune to spoofing. The IRS utilizes gyroscopes, accelerometers, and other advanced equipment to provide navigation guidance when a pilot's visibility is limited.

 



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OPSGROUP expressed grave concern over the susceptibility of IRS to spoofing, stating, "IRS should be a standalone system, unable to be spoofed." The group further noted that multiple reports confirm the successful spoofing of IRS, a development that significantly elevates the risk associated with these attacks. As shown in their map, OPSGROUP has identified three distinct spoofing zones in the Middle East. 

 

An empty Ben Gurion International Airport (TLV) in January 2021 | Photo: Israel Hayom

 

Top Incidents

 

Among the most troubling incidents reported include:

 

  • A Bombardier Global Express encountered a false GPS position during departure from LLBG/Tel Aviv, prompting a controller's warning regarding an unauthorized approach to a restricted area.
  • A Boeing 777 endured a 30-minute GPS spoofing incident in the Cairo FIR, with the aircraft's position being falsely displayed as stationary overhead LLBG.
  • A Gulfstream G650 experienced full navigation failure upon departure from Tel Aviv, prompting ATC intervention and revealing a false GPS position 225 nautical miles south of the aircraft's actual location.
  • A Bombardier Global 7500 encountered three separate spoofing events in the Cairo FIR, resulting in the loss of GPS and IRS signals.
  • An Embraer Legacy 650 en route from Europe to Dubai lost GPS and IRS signals in Baghdad airspace, causing the aircraft to veer off course and nearly enter Iranian airspace without authorization.
  • A Bombardier Challenger 604 is experiencing spoofing in the Baghdad FIR, requiring vectors to Doha. The aircraft's navigation systems were rendered unusable, necessitating continuous ATC guidance.

 

GPS spoofing incidents in the Middle East from August to October 2023 | Photo: OPSGROUP

 

The slow response from the aviation industry to these incidents has left flight crews to devise their own detection and mitigation strategies. However, increased reliance on air traffic control, already stretched thin by their daily workload, is not a sustainable solution.

 



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Professor Todd Humphreys

 

University of Texas professor Todd Humphreys likened GPS spoofing to a zero-day exploit against aviation systems, emphasizing the industry's unpreparedness and exposure to such attacks. He and other researchers have warned about the potential for IRS spoofing for over a decade.

 

Professor Todd Humphreys | Photo: The University of Texas at Austin

 

While the exact perpetrators behind these GPS spoofing attacks remain unconfirmed, suspicions point towards countries like Israel and Iran. The potential consequences of these attacks underscore the urgent need for the aviation industry to develop robust countermeasures and enhance pilot training to detect and respond to such incidents effectively.

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Franco Grobler
Passionate aviation enthusiast from South Africa dedicated to bringing you articles on the latest aviation news, I aim to inspire and inform. I am set on embarking pilot training in 2024 to soar to new heights in the aviation world.

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NEWS GPS Spoofing Hackers Cybersecurity Security Middle East OPSGROUP Israel Tel Aviv TLV Cairo CAI Egypt Dubai Iraq Baghdad BGW DXB Geopolitics Iran

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